Reflections on the French revolution in France
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Reflections on the French revolution in France

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Published by Doubleday in Garden City, N.Y .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • France -- History -- Revolution, 1789-1799 -- Causes.,
  • France -- Politics and government -- 1789-1799.,
  • Great Britain -- Politics and government -- 1760-1820.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementEdmund Burke. The rights of man / Thomas Paine.
SeriesDolphin book -- C246
ContributionsBurke, Edmund, 1729-1797., Paine, Thomas, 1737-1809..
The Physical Object
Pagination515 p. ;
Number of Pages515
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22077890M

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Reflections on the Revolution in France is a classic work in a range of fields from history through political science to literature, and securely holds its place among the canon of "great books." Yet its meaning is still contested and often misunderstood, equally by those who wish to admire or to denigrate Burke for his present-day relevance/5(). Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France, Thomas Paine, Rights of Man, These two pamphlets represent the premier bare-knuckle political prize-fight of its time. In the blue corner – Irish statesman and Whig grandee, aesthetic theorist and small-C conservative, it's the Dublin Dynamo, Edmund ‘Berserk’ Burke/5(). Edmund Burke Reflections on the Revolution in France Read by Matt Addis unabridged. Written in the form of a letter to a Frenchman, Edmund Burke’s Reflections on the Revolution in France is an impassioned attack on the French Revolution and its hasty destruction of the Church, the old elites and the Crown. Burke tackles the new republic and its allegiance to principles such as liberty and. Reflections on the Revolution in France is a classic work in a range of fields from history through political science to literature, and securely holds its place among the canon of “great books.” Yet its meaning is still contested and often misunderstood, equally by those who wish to admire or to denigrate Burke for his present-day relevance/5().

COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus. Reflections on the Revolution in France Edmund Burke Glossary artificial: Resulting from human intelligence and skill. Antonym of ‘natural’; not in the least dyslogistic. assignat: ‘Promissory note issued by the revolutionary government of France on the security of State lands’.Cited by: In his famous Reflections on the Revolution in France (), Edmund Burke excoriated French revolutionary leaders for recklessly destroying France's venerable institutions and way of life. But his war against the French intelligentsia did not end there, and Burke continued to take pen in hand against the Jacobins until his death in Cited by: This new and up-to-date edition of a book that has been central to political philosophy, history, and revolutionary thought for two hundred years offers readers a dire warning of the consequences that follow the mismanagement of change. Written for a generation presented with challenges of terrible proportions--the Industrial, American, and French Revolutions, to name the most obvious--Burke's 3/5(10).

Reflections on the Revolution in France is a book by Edmund Burke, one of the best-known intellectual attacks against the (then-infant) French Revolution. In the twentieth century, it much influenced conservative and classical liberal intellectuals, who recast Burke's Whig arguments as a critique of Communism and Socialist revolutionary programmes. Start your review of Two Classics of the French Revolution: Reflections on the Revolution in France/The Rights of Man Write a review Geoff Sebesta rated it really liked it4/5. Edmund Burke writes to a young French correspondent, Depont, who has asked for his views of the current revolutionary events taking place in explains that he does not approve of the French Revolution, or the Revolution Society, which is in contact with France’s National Assembly and seeks to extend Revolutionary principles in England. Written in the form of a letter to a Frenchman, Edmund Burke’s Reflections on the Revolution in France is an impassioned attack on the French Revolution and its hasty destruction of the Church, the old elites and the Crown. Burke tackles the new republic and its allegiance to principles such as liberty and equality, as well as its failure to recognize the complexities of human nature.